Elimination

Today is World Hepatitis Day, with the theme of Elimination.

2016 is a crucial year for addressing hepatitis. At the World Health Assembly in May, the World Health Organisation (WHO) Member States endorsed the first ever draft Elimination Strategy for Viral Hepatitis, with the ambitious goal to eliminate hepatitis as a public health threat by 2013.


Hepatitis C is a blood-borne virus that can lead to scarring (cirrhosis) or cancer of the liver if left untreated.

The virus is a serious infectious disease, but with the right early diagnosis and treatment, hepatitis C can be curable.

Hepatitis C disproportionately affects the marginalised groups of people Blenheim works with, including intravenous drug users, prisoners and immigrant populations. Public Health England reported that in 2015 50% of injecting drug users have hepatitis C, up from 45% in 2005.

Therefore, for years, Blenheim has called on NHS England, Public Health England and the Department of Health to make the elimination of hepatitis C a clear priority. We advocate that substance misuse services, the NHS and local authorities must do more to test, treat and cure those with hepatitis C.

In 2014, Blenheim became a member of the Hepatitis C Coalition – along with a group of leading clinicians, patients, organisations and other interested parties, we are committed to the reduction of morbidity and mortality associated with hepatitis C, and its eventual elimination.

To achieve elimination of hepatitis C, we need:

  • greater awareness about the virus,
  • better prevention – including harm reduction such as injection safety,
  • increased testing and diagnosis, and

Greater Awareness, Better Prevention

Injecting drug use continues to be the most important risk factor for contracting the infection because the virus is able to directly enter the blood stream via a needle. Approximately 50% of intravenous drug users are thought to be infected with the virus. Other forms of drug use, like sharing bank notes or straws to snort powders, also pose a significant risk of transmission. More information about risk factors can be found on the Hepatitis C Trust website.

Increased Testing and Diagnosis

You can always go to your GP or GUM Clinic and ask to be tested for the virus. If you are accessing a drug or alcohol service then you should speak to your keyworker or a member of staff about having the test. Services can provide a blood-borne virus (BBV) test for you, but if this isn’t available then they will support you to arrange this with your GP, or another healthcare provider.

Hepatitis C is a ‘silent epidemic’ because it is often asymptomatic in the early stages and can be difficult to diagnose. This means that in most cases, the symptoms are absent, mild, or simply vague. It is important to get tested if you have ever shared injecting equipment, even if it was many years ago, because you may not experience any symptoms. Although there are no set symptoms, common complaints related to the disease can include:

  • Problems with concentration and memory
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Flu-like symptoms, including sweating or headaches
  • Alcohol intolerance
  • Depression or mood swings
  • Digestive problems, including nausea, loss of appetite or weight loss
  • General aches and pains, or specific discomfort in the area of the liver

These symptoms can usually be alleviated with therapy. However, the symptoms people suffer are not necessarily an indication of whether they have liver damage or not.

Better Treatment

Anti-viral therapies have advanced greatly in recent years and are now able to clear the virus, thus preventing the progression of liver disease. These NICE approved treatments cure the virus for around 70-80% of people. Treatment has been shown to reduce both inflammation of the liver and fibrosis. There is also evidence that cases of cirrhosis can sometimes be reversed through treatment.

Decisions about treatment options should be made with your doctor. You can also contact the Hepatitis C Trust’s helpline on 0845 223 4424 for more information.

Blenheim: Test, Treat, Cure

In order to address the low levels of hepatitis treatment amongst our service users, in 2014/15, we introduced a range of initiatives in partnership with PHE, Hepatitis C Trust and the London Working Party on Hepatitis C. We have trained over 100 hepatitis champions throughout the organisation to identify the levels of hepatitis amongst our service users and to support the people affected with accessing treatment.

And progress is being made. Last year, 94% of Blenheim’s new clients that inject drugs or have previously injected drugs, had a Hepatitis C test – an increase from 87% in 2014/2015.

Furthermore, we are currently supporting the I’m Worth… campaign, which has been created to support people living with hepatitis C. It aims to address the stigma that many people with hepatitis C face, encouraging and empowering people living with hepatitis C to access care and services. It emphasises that everyone living with hepatitis C is entitled to the best care.


To find out more about Hepatitis C, please take a look at the factsheet on our website.

Test, Treat, Cure.
      

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